Science In My Life is maintained by John R. Hoffman, Professor of Biology and a scientist examining the recovery of the nervous system after injury.

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3/11 Frankenstein, Spanish flu, Fleming, and drinking water activities

Frankenstein published (1818)
The novel Frankenstein by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was first published in 1818.  Mary Shelley was eighteen when she began writing the novel and finished it when she was 21.  This classic gothic story focuses on Dr. Victor Frankenstein’s reanimation of dead body parts in the creation of his monster and then having to face the effects of what he created.  Electronic versions of the original book are available on the Project Gutenberg site. (image of Frankenstein’s Monster from Wikimedia Commons)

The first case of the Spanish flu was reported (1918)
The 1918-1919 Spanish flu epidemic caused the death of between 50 – 100 million people.  This devastating outbreak affected nearly everyone as approximately 1/3 of the population got sick from the disease and about 2.5% of those died from complications of the flu.  Almost all cases of the influenza A illnesses since that time are related to the original.  The H1N1 pandemic of 2009-2010 was a slightly different substrain of the virus that was more dangerous than many recent strains of the flu, but not as bad as the original Spanish flu.

Alexander Fleming died (1955)
Sir Alexander Fleming (1881 – 1955) was a Scottish Physician that served in the Army Medical Corps during World War I.  After the war, he studied the influenza virus and discovered that a mold growing on a petri dish of bacteria prevented the bacteria from growing.  He experimented further and discovered that the mold was producing penicillin.  Penicillin was purified and then  used as the first antibiotic to treat infections.  Fleming was knighted in 1944 and received a share of the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1945.

Celebrating Ground Water Awareness Week

Environmental Protection Agency Drinking water activities and interactive games for kids K-3.

Environmental Protection Agency Water Sense learning resources and activities designed for students in grades 3-5 to help children understand how important it is and how easy it is to save water.

Environmental Protection Agency Drinking water activities and interactive games for kids 4-8.

Environmental Protection Agency Drinking water activities and interactive games for kids 9-12.

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